Good News!

I received great news earlier this week: I was offered the job of Copywriter Specialist with Web.com! I was very excited and accepted, so I start my career on Monday. After months of searching, applying, interviewing, and almost losing hope, I can put my Bachelor’s of English degree to good work and start paying off my student debt! The job consists of what I’ve been doing for several years now for both personal and professional work: writing content for business websites. I will be working with a team of fellow writers and editors to build brochure-style websites for professionals and businesses, working on the content pages before the design and coding team works their magic. If all goes well, I plan to stay with this company and build my career for several years.

Have no fear, I’ll still be writing! I am continuing my editing work on finished books, which mostly involves typing out the written version of Last of the Avians (whose title changed once I realized “Avian” is a more efficient term than “Winged Person”). I am also still publishing Hub Pages articles on how to write novels, using my own experience and advice from professional and academic sources. I even plan on writing a “How To Get A Job” aka What College Doesn’t Teach You article outlining what I have learned in these past few months alone (and wish I knew yeas ago!). If there are any other articles you would like to see from me, such as explaining more closely some of the steps (like Self-Publishing vs. Traditional Publishing) or other writing topics, please let me know!

Step Six: Publish

Have you finished writing and editing your novel? If so, it’s time to get it published! Don’t let that beautiful manuscript and all that hard work go to waste, get you novel on the bookshelves! My latest Hub Pages article talks about all the different aspects of publishing and what authors should know when going into this step of the process.

Quick Tip: Avoid vanity presses, they sometimes turn out to be scams and force you to spend more money than necessary!

Step Five: Edit

What some authors consider the hardest part of writing a novel is what comes after writing: editing! In my latest Hub Pages article, I talk about the editing process and the truth about editors. Editing is a very important part of writing, so authors should embrace the inevitable and take the opportunity to receive as much feedback as possible before submitting their manuscript for publication.

Quick Tip: Take a break after finishing your novel before beginning the editing process!

Step Four: Write

The next step to Write a Novel is to actually do some writing! Now that all the planning, research, and outlining is taken care of, you can start digging into your story. In this HubPages article, I give tips on daily writing, formatting, and novel guidelines.

Quick Tip: Start formatting your manuscript while you write, so it’ll be easier to edit and submit for publication once your novel is complete!

Step Three: Research

Research is just as important as writing in the process of creating a novel. In my latest Hub Pages article, I talk about the research methods and sources for authors before they start writing. Writers often research while they write as well, but it’s good to start off with some information to aid in writing. Doing too much research could interrupt the writing process!

Quick Tip: Libraries are your friends; get your hands on some physical books, smell the old pages, instead of relying solely on internet resources.

Writing Progress

I devised a writing schedule for myself to get motivated and to focus on my original work while job-hunting. Right now I’m trying to edit the books I’ve already written instead of trying to write anything new or finish other projects. I carved out a block of my day to work on several of these writing projects, switching them up so I don’t hit a block or lose inspiration.

The Planet of Dreams

I’ve been working on the Planet of Dream Series for several years, originally writing in a large notebook during travel, trips to the beach, and whenever I had time to write! I finished it recently, but now have to undertake the process of getting the handwritten version typed up on the computer. Once I have everything typed up, I can go back and make further edits, getting the manuscript ready for publication.

The Day I Howled

I’ve finally begun looking at Howled for some serious editing. Because I was a novice when I began this children’s book, and because the audience is not what I usually write for, I have a lot of work cut out for me! I ended up cutting out a lot of scenes (actually, about three whole chapters!) and made a lot of notes for moving forward. I may have to rewrite about half of the book, keeping in mind the audience I’m aiming for, but it’s on my schedule, among other books to work on.

Conference Paper

For a mythology class during my senior year at Flagler, I wrote a paper on Loki as an anti-hero. My professor and I got to talking, and decided to put together a panel for the PCAS conference! Myself, along with two other students, will present a panel for the upcoming conference in October at New Orleans. I’ve been working on my paper to get it conference ready, adding in elements of the Marvel movies and re-organizing the content for the presentation. It’s a fun experience, since I love the topic, and I may be able to submit for a student award!

Saving You

The third original novel I’m working on for this schedule is something I wrote for High School and reworked during a college class, so I’m not as worried about the editing. Because I added scenes and did some editing for the class, I have a good idea of how this is shaping up and just need to rearrange some scenes to make everything fit. This one will be Young Adult just like the Planet of Dreams Series, so I’m more familiar with the audience.

(I haven’t even looked at the final notes on my play yet, oops!)

How to Write Plot

The last step to planning is to write plot, full of conflict and built on a structure of writing fortitude. The latest Hug Pages article I wrote on the subject deals with all the essentials related to plotting: action, protagonists and antagonists, twists, and more! Before you can write a story, you have to know what you’re writing and the stakes your characters have to face.

Quick Tip: An antagonist doesn’t have to be a villain, and without action a story can go nowhere!